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Process redesign for time-based emergency admission targets

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health Organization and Management, September 2016
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Title
Process redesign for time-based emergency admission targets
Published in
Journal of Health Organization and Management, September 2016
DOI 10.1108/jhom-08-2015-0114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra G. Leggat, Richard Gough, Timothy Bartram, Pauline Stanton, Greg J. Bamber, Ruth Ballardie, Amrik Sohal

Abstract

Purpose Hospitals have used process redesign to increase the efficiency of the emergency department (ED) to cope with increasing demand. While there are published studies suggesting a positive outcome, recent reviews have reported that it is difficult to conclude that these approaches are effective as a result of substandard research methodology. The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of hospital staff on the impact of a process redesign initiative on quality of care. Design/methodology/approach A retrospective qualitative case study examining a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) initiative in a large metropolitan hospital from 2009 to 2010. Non-probability sampling identified interview subjects who, through their participation in the redesign initiative, had a detailed understanding of the implementation and outcomes of the initiative. Between April 2012 and January 2013 26 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed with thematic content analysis. Findings There were four important findings. First, when asked to comment on the impact of the LSS implementation, without prompting the staff spoke of quality of care. Second, there was little agreement among the participants as to whether the project had been successful. Third, despite the recognition of the need for a coordinated effort across the hospital to improve ED access, the redesign process was not successful in reducing existing divides among clinicians and among managers and clinicians. Finally, staff expressed tension between production processes to move patients more quickly and their duty of care to their patients as individuals. Originality/value One of the first studies to explore the impact of process redesign through in-depth interviews with participating staff, this study adds further evidence that organisations implementing process redesign must ensure the supporting management practices are in place.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 22%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Unspecified 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 18 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 15 31%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 8%
Unspecified 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 18 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2018.
All research outputs
#10,350,306
of 12,974,406 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health Organization and Management
#209
of 274 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,279
of 255,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health Organization and Management
#9
of 10 outputs
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